Guest Blog Feature by the lovely Kindra Sowder

guestblogMy soon to be best friend, Kindra Sowder featured me in a guest blog post earlier today. Since the book isn't out yet, it's nothing more than a mere author bio and a former blurb for The Dark World: Book 1, but according to Kindra, it seems to be drawing a lot of attention to her site. Which is incredible for me because I had been going through this very long stage of not really sharing anything on social networks - the simple fact was I felt like I had nothing to truly share. Because my book wasn't yet out I felt as though I had nothing 'worth' sharing - no product, no interest.

This guest blog proves me wrong.

Since it's posting earlier today, Kindra's told me it's seen 42 page views and its rising, whereas a few other authors with Permuted I respect the hell out of have said they think I rock and other positive things.

It's a huge boost to the self-esteem and amazing to know that my fellow colleagues see me as someone worthy to indulge in the written word with and even WANT to read my book when it comes out next year.

I mean the more I read their work, the more blown away I am by the group of amazing people I've gratefully been chosen to produce content alongside.

I know this sounds like a massive circle jerk, but really, Permutants (that's what we call each other, shush), are extremely talented authors and all of the work I've read (in pictures below) from them I haven't disliked yet.

I wish to do their affinity for me justice once The Dark World Series gets rolling, and who knows, I may even gain a few people outside of we Permutants that like my work. :)

tentyrian legacy sadwingsofdestiny 20828228

Keep your bite!

-S.C. Parris

Interview with Nostrovia! Poetry!

You can read the interview on their website here, but for those of you not too keen on clicking links, here's the interview in its entirety below: Tell us a little bit about your writing career.

I’ve self-published two stories, entitled, The Dark World, and The Immortal’s Guide respectively. They are a part of a series, that is to have two more books to complete the series in the coming years. I’ve also had a short story published in my college’s newspaper, The Vignette, and have had a poem published upon winning a contest whilst in middle school.

And of course there is the short story recently published with Before Sunrise Press, A Night of Frivolity.

What writers have had an influence on how you write?

Edgar Allan Poe absolutely had an influence on how I write. I first read his stories, The Raven, and the Tell-Tale Heart and was absolutely hooked. All things dark, bloody, and psychologically troubling that I write (mostly the poems I have written), I attribute subconsciously to Mr. Poe. J.K. Rowling was an author I grew up on, and how to tell a story was further expanded with reading the Harry Potter series, naturally.

There are many more authors that have influenced in some way how I write, but those are the two that have stayed with me and have had lasting impacts on my writing style.

How early did you begin writing?

I’ve been writing since I learned how.

My earliest memories of writing include being told to write a story (I forget about what) whilst in elementary school, but I remember writing a fairly mysterious, border-line horror story that included my little brother. It became poems from there whilst in middle school (to the acclaim of the English teachers in the school), and finally full-grown novels at the tail-end of my middle school career where I started writing The Dark World.

What’s your writing process like?

Hmm. I don’t believe I have a process. Well, that is until recently at least.

Before I would only write what came to mind, and I still do to some affect, but now I make it a point to outline my bigger works, expounding on the story as I go. I find, no matter how I try to prepare for the writing journey, that I usually end up writing what comes to mind regardless of the outline sketched out.

What are some specific troubles you have with writing? How do you over come them?

Besides getting stuck in a story, wanting to get somewhere (usually more interesting) than where I am, I do get bogged down with wanting to jump over the hurdle and just write the intense action scene, or the ‘big-reveal’ scene and leave the fairly mundane stuff to someone else (but there never is anyone else, is there). I overcome these nonsensical problems by gritting my teeth and writing through the mundane scenes to get to where I’m going, or sometimes (and rarely), I’ll write the action scene I want to write, realize (usually) that it has no place in the story, and go back and write the mundane scenes anyway.

I’ve been asked a number of times about writing articles on overcoming writer’s block. For our fellow writers looking to “arouse their Muse”, how do you overcome writer’s block?

As I mentioned above, I do get stuck in my writing. I used to get seriously sad about experiencing writer’s block, but recently with my having to write the sequel to The Dark World, The Immortal’s Guide (my fans would not take no for an answer), I learned, the fairly hard way, that there was no such thing as a “Muse,” and that if I was to get paid for writing, it was a job like anything else.

In 2012, I hunkered down and threw away any fancies I had about my “Muse,” and wrote The Immortal’s Guide until I couldn’t take it anymore. I followed the outline I had penned, and within a very stressful year, completed it to meet my deadline. That was when I realized I could write without relying on a “Muse,” to motivate me. But of course there are moments where you can’t get anything out at all. These moments I allow myself to have (if I can spare them). I often go to family and friends for advice on any works as I’m writing them for inspiration as well.

When it comes to writing, do you keep a particular ritualistic schedule, or do you loosely write when the moment strikes?

Now that I’m editing The Dark World, I do make myself try to get at least a few hours of editing in every day if I can. With finals and a puppy to watch over, it is often hard to find time as of now. But I know in the summer I’ll be back to writing every day (or every other day) to get it done.

As for my other projects, I do write when the moment strikes, but as I’ve said, I’ve tried to stop that and write at least every day, and if I don’t, I don’t beat myself up about it – there’s a time and place for everything after all.

Before Sun Rise Press is a quality publisher. Can you give a brief synopsis of the work you had published with them?

When the daring Miss Clarke enters a gentlemen’s club in London on one cold day in January, the year 1714, she is met with a most cunning vampire who would only see her his before the night is through. With several onlookers, unwanted solicitations, and the watching dark eyes of the mysterious Alexander upon her, Miss Patricia Clarke is forced before long to decide whether her desired night of frowned-upon fun is worth the trouble…and the blood in A NIGHT OF FRIVOLITY.

Finish this statement; I think writing should … drive you mad, and inspire you, in-turn, inspiring others to create what they want to create without fear of disapproval or denial. ___ Keep your bite!

-S.C. Parris

Interview With Before Sunrise Press for my vampiric-period piece "A Night of Frivolity"!

beforesunrisepressinterview Check out my interview with Before Sunrise Press below or click the picture to go directly to their website!

Recently our staff interviewer, Billie Watts, sat down with S.C. Parris to discuss her upcoming Before Sunrise Press release, “A Night of Frivolity” - available on Kindle and in other eBook formats, April 18.

Before Sunrise Press: To start things off, how about you introduce yourself to readers who many not be familiar?

S.C. Parris: “I’m Sheron Sylvestre (pen name S.C. Parris), I live on Long Island with my family and my Siberian Husky. I’ve written stories and poems for as long as I can remember, had half-starts with stories when I was younger, and had a poem published in a book of students’ poetry in middle school. I’ve explored many avenues of art, such as drawing and the like, but the things that have stayed with me have been writing (books, poems, screenplays), and acting. I guess I’m just drawn to the written word - or at least story-telling.”

BSP: Who would you cite as your primary influences?

Parris: “Edgar Allan Poe jump-started my love of writing. His macabre, grim, yet beautiful way of penning a horror story/poem reached my adolescent heart in ways I didn’t even realize would influence me so directly. J.K. Rowling is, of course, another inspiration of mine as I’ve read her books since my mother pushed the first Harry Potter in my hands and told me it was okay to read. I believe it’s Misses Rowling that’s really inspired me to set aside the short stories and poems and delve into full-length stories. I also pick up bits and pieces from all authors’ works I read, far too many to name, of course.”

BSP: Why don’t you tell us, without spoiling anything, what your short story is about?

Parris: “A woman with a head for rebellion meets her match in a strange man on a night out in town.”

BSP: You actively chose to set the story in the 1700s. What was it about that era that you found so appealing?

Parris: “Ah, I’ve always been drawn to the cobble-stoned streets, gas-lit lamps, and horse drawn carriages that marked that period. There was always something magical about it and I guess I find it somehow easier to draw upon the world and characters that live (and thrive) in that time. I have been called an “old soul” by many.”

BSP: Recently the whole ‘vampire’ genre has undergone a complete makeover as a result of the Twilight series, and I think a lot would argue for the worse. Where do you stand on Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series?

Parris: “I read New Moon first without knowing it was part of a series and there were many times that I literally threw the book across the room - I’m obviously not a fan of what Mrs. Meyer has “done” to the vampire genre. […] I believe that she hasn’t really done anything to the vampire genre - only put her own bizarre twist on these creatures and called them ‘vampire’. Regardless, there is something enigmatic about vampires, about the burdens they face, their lust for something they cannot possess freely - it’s all fascinating to me and it always has been. (My mother confessed to watching tons of vampire movies while I was still in the womb.)”

BSP: Where do you think your interest stemmed from?

Parris: “I believe my first (memorable) encounter with vampires was in the movie Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) - I was equal parts horrified and enamored with the creature that wrapped so many around his long finger. The lore has stayed with me ever since.”

BSP: In your opinion, what do you consider the greatest vampire story ever told?

Parris: “As I’m not yet finished reading the original novel of Dracula by the one and only Bram Stoker, I can’t count it as one of the greatest ever told, though it sure is shaping up that way. Of all the vampire novels I’ve read and movies I’ve seen, I’m hard pressed to name one that’s stood out to me as the greatest ever told. If movies are allowed in this, I would say the movie adaptation of Interview with the Vampire has stuck with me as a great vampire story, though I haven’t read the original novel so I’m not certain how much weight that holds.”

BSP: Do you have any other writing projects coming up? What other genres do you like to explore?

Parris: “I have many. I’ve self-published two vampire/fantasy novels (The Dark World & The Immortal’s Guide) in the past two years and I’ve three more in that series due out soon. Besides those, I’ve many other projects lined up to be completed either this year or within the next two. One of those being a paranormal romance set in modern times currently entitled ‘Judgment’ and another that will be the start of a new series, a purely fantasy/adventure novel set around an assassin/mercenary and his band of hired men as they go around their deceptive world, doing the most untouchable work for the highest pay.”

We’d like to thank S.C. personally for taking the time to let us interview her. Be sure to check out her vampiric period piece, “A Night of Frivolity”, set to be released April 18, 2013 by Before Sunrise Press. __________________________________________________________________ Follow S.C. on Twitter Follow S.C. on Tumblr ‘Like’ S.C. Parris on Facebook Read S.C.’s Blog on WordPress S.C. on Goodreads

Follow our interviewer, Billie, on Twitter

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And that's that! Hope you enjoyed it and will pick up A Night of Frivolity April 18th!

Keep your bite!

S.C. Parris

Interview from Romania!

On Goodreads, I got this message: andrexinterviewAnd replied back in the positive (of course)!

Here's the interview! (His book-review blog is all mostly in Romanian.)

1. Describe yourself in a word.

Ambitious

2. What's your favourite book/author?

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling but my favorite author, I'd say is Edgar Allan Poe.

3. What's the advice that you'd give to the young writers?

Never give up, keep writing, keep honing your craft, write, write, write, and above all, believe in your story/poem...etc. You can do it and if you're writing, you're already living your dream.

4. Tell us something about your other passions.

Besides writing, I enjoy acting and hope to one day act in indie films and other ventures I create. I write scripts as well. I enjoy video games, creating shirts in my e-store for my books. 5. What do you think about Romania?

I have never been to Romania but I'd love to go one day.

6. What kind of music do you like?

I love rock, metal, classic rock, some pop, and some hip-hop. I mostly love everything, but rock takes a great precedent over other genres for me.

7. Tell us something about your book.

I'll just give you the blurb:

"Her name...is Alexandria Stone."

These are some of the last words Xavier Delacroix hears from his beloved Eleanor Black...just before she bursts into a Lycan Creature. And if this wasn't enough to rattle Xavier's brilliant mind, other Vampires - namely Dracula - are becoming elusive and speaking only in vague air about Xavier's supposedly brilliant blood.

But with a human to find, Lycans to kill, and questions to ask, Xavier is not so sure what to believe anymore...or who.

8. Do you have a message for your romanian fans?

Oh yes! Thank you so much for having an interest in my story and wanting it in your lovely country. :)

9. What do you think about my blog?

I just checked it out and I love it. I love the book reviews that you guys do and spreading the word about new authors and their books. It's pretty awesome.

Is there any chance that you can give us a copy of your book and some bookmarks&swags for a giveaway?

I just may be able to!

Thank you so much for the interview Andrex, it was illuminating! And I hope your readers enjoy The Dark World and The Immortal's Guide!

Keep your bite,

-S.C. Parris